The perpetual cyclist

What is it with tourists?

As I was cycling along today (which I am meant to do everyday – hmm subject of another post) the inevitable happened.  A nice looking couple, obviously from my home country England, judging by the accents, decided to ask me for directions to the beach.  Me – who obviously just looks like I’m out for a morning meander on my cruiser bike rather than the huffing, puffing lard arse that I was feeling.  

Great I thought!  How does one give directions when one is not supposed to stop and allow gravity to give one an adrenaline attack?  The solution, in her best British matching accent, was “sorray, I can’t stop due to a health condition. It’s that way” waving an arm in a vague direction behind me, and carried on.  Er sorry, who says that, was that complicated answer really necessary you idiot?  They looked a little bemused – I mean who says they can’t stop due to a health condition?  I bet they thought, should she be actually riding a bike with a health condition?  Or, she looks all right to me, what was that all about?  Must be a nutter.  Anyway, let’s hope they found the beach…

Truth is everytime I try to explain what I’ve got, I just get bemused faces as people try to understand it.  Probably no different to mine – I find it bemusing myself.

Here’s another classic.  My friend was asking if my adrenaline symptoms only appeared in the face of stressful situations.  She knows anxiety very well and was trying to understand it in the context of what she has experienced.  When I tell her they also come on when I exercise, laugh, talk too much or get excited (excitable little fruit cake that I am) she laughed and then said ‘oh?’ – well, yes, I guess it does sound a little “out of the box”, doesn’t it.  So this thing I have is obviously not an “in the box” type of thing and I have to confess I do get amused these days trying to explain what I have and how best to do that without invoking blank or bemused faces!!  Literally it’s like ‘oooh, that’s a bit hard for me,  anyway, as I was saying….’

Sometimes with this thing there’s no explaining it, it isn’t logical nor can I always detect cause and effect – it just does what it does.  So I just need to ‘be’, accept it and work around it each day as best I can and try to help my friends understand it as best they can too.  She says with a big sigh.


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